What did you build this week?

Clinedesign said:
Carb light.

light_zpsd0f439c1.jpg


Carb is from CL77 Honda.

Did you make that light bulb cage?
 
More work on this thing
 

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SONIC. said:
...And cold proofing my shop. I went through 500 bucks in propane in the last 13 days. Emptied my tank. Fuck this weather. So we have been redoing insulation where its worn, filling door gap, made a big swinging door to cover the exhaust fan when its not in use etc.

Wood heat man - get a big woodstove in there, or a pellet stove if you want a self-feeding unit. Nothing like wood heat.
 
Agreed Tim.
After seeing the propane prices for next year (I'm locked in this year) wood stove is absolutely in my future. The problem is my shop is huge and wide open so it will take hours to get warm with a wood heater. I think the plan is to keep the propane for the initial heat up and then use the wood to keep it warm
 
Totally different scale, but when we were looking at heating options for the cottage in the fall, we considered a wall mounted propane furnace. Just a small 35,000 BTU unit or the like. What we found is in fact propane is very slow compared to wood, and it's also a 'damp' heat.

You build a roaring fire in a large woodstove and you're looking at massive BTU. Get a fan in there or a stove with a blower and you're golden. An actual wood-fired central air furnace might be the best option, if it's a large shop. My inlaws had a wood-fired furnace in their home. Forced air heat, but with wood as the fuel.
 
+1 on that. Wood heat is fast, cheap and with either a fan or funance ducts it is easy to heat large areas. Only thing is you have to be there to add fuel, unless it is pellets. And a regular stove has no thermostat. It just gets hotter and hotter. But from the sounds of it your space can handle it.

Sent from my MB525 using Tapatalk 2
 
Yeah the wood shop is 75x50 with 20 ft ceilings so its a bitch to heat. Poorly insulated.

I'm going to build a double barrel stove next week and see how that does since its cheap and I have the barrels. If it works well I may upgrade to a nicer pre made furnace
 
Tim said:
Totally different scale, but when we were looking at heating options for the cottage in the fall, we considered a wall mounted propane furnace. Just a small 35,000 BTU unit or the like. What we found is in fact propane is very slow compared to wood, and it's also a 'damp' heat.

You build a roaring fire in a large woodstove and you're looking at massive BTU. Get a fan in there or a stove with a blower and you're golden. An actual wood-fired central air furnace might be the best option, if it's a large shop. My inlaws had a wood-fired furnace in their home. Forced air heat, but with wood as the fuel.

Propane creates humidity because of the hydrogen, but that can be counteracted with ventilation and draft. Propane actually has the highest BTU output compared to natural gas, but the per dollar comparison makes natural gas cheaper. Depending on how much you pay for a cord of wood, if anything at all, wood can actually be the cheapest of all heating methods. The caveat is it has to be dry. Green wood produces 3/4 to 1/2 the BTU's of dry wood. It all depends on the wood though. Outside of Pinon Pine or Osage, which you have to live in the southwest for, Hickory, Dogwood, Hornbeam, Apple, White Oak, Ash, Douglas Fir and Locust are best. When we fire wood kilns, we start with pine, black walnut, birch, or even hemlock to get a slow start then add hardwoods when temps get above 1100 degrees. It's nothing to get a wood kiln above 2400 degrees, where most gas or propane slows down significantly as it approaches 2300.
 
The time in-between wrenching, a 15-month-old, and the jobby job (I'll sleep when I'm dead)…

Analog Set- carved and laminated MDO, vintage suitcase, ceramic, willow branch, tinted latex
 

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Nice work. Funny, I have most of those real pieces in my garage somewhere....I have a hard time throwing out old tech.
 
canyoncarver said:
Nice work. Funny, I have most of those real pieces in my garage somewhere....I have a hard time throwing out old tech.

It can be worth money. There's a big market for vintage audio, particularly certain tube amps, speakers and brands/models of turntables. 60's era Fischer tube amps can go for more than $1000. I have a set of Allison bookshelf speakers that sound amazing and go for $150 each. Not bad for speakers that were made in 1980.
 
Finished and played with alittle. it works great i dont know how lived with out one. next is the big guy i learned a few lessons making this one so im off to the races very soon
 

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bradj said:
Finished and played with alittle. it works great i dont know how lived with out one. next is the big guy i learned a few lessons making this one so im off to the races very soon

Hot damn you even painted it 8)
Looks sick
 
While bradj figures out how he lived without the wheel , im tryin to figure out how i made it this far without a lift
 

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