Yamaha rd350 Road Racer Liquid Cooled!!

ridesolo

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Wow, great deal on that brake. Is it luck or clean living? Hmmm, must be luck. ;D
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Since I lost some pieces when I parted it out, I'm looking for a few gt250 brake bits as well...

http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=71151.0
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

ridesolo said:
Wow, great deal on that brake. Is it luck or clean living? Hmmm, must be luck. ;D
Lol yeah, I'm thinking luck
 

J-Rod10

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Here is how I run my cable set up.
Simple, clean, and it works.
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

That's really similar to how I was planning to go with it
 

jpmobius

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Remember to keep your pedal to crank arm length ratio the same as stock if you wish to keep the same pressure and pedal travel as original. Also, keep in mind that the crank arm can be rotated to any position to accommodate good cable routing. Design your cable routing with as few bends as possible. It will function much better and last much longer. Don't design your set up to accommodate an existing off the shelf cable unless it is virtually the exact thing you want. Design your system and then make it (or have it made) the correct length cable to fit it. Making cables is pretty easy if you start with an existing cable like the factory Suzuki part and simply shorten it to the correct length. This also allows you to potentially select a new cable end that might be better or easier for your design. You should silver solder the new end to ensure its strength - it is a brake after all. And when creating your set up be sure to set it up ideally for the suspension at normal ride height and them move the suspension through its full range of motion to make sure the cable is able to flex smoothly to any position. There is usually a compromise between making the shortest, straightest cable/routing and having good geometry through the full range of suspension travel. With a little care you can have both.
 

jpmobius

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Found a couple of pics of that same brake that show a bit more of the construction. I didn't want to weld or bolt a cable carrier to my drum backing plate (excellent job on finding the (nearly) bolt on Suzuki replacement!) so I fabricated the small arm between the axle and torque arm to hold it. It's all aluminum and really light as it is quite small. The cable is a stock Yamaha part on the brake end but I can't remember from what bike. The pedal end is cutoff to the length I needed, and I think the socket fitting that holds the housing and bolts to the peg mount is also from the same original cable. I cut the threaded section from a bolt that fits the rod end I used and bored a hole through it and silver soldered it to the cable. Pretty simple and the cable will part before the soldered connection will give up so it is very strong. I also made a steel bracket to mount the actual cable to mostly to make it small. As I recall the aluminum versions I thought up were too big and chunky looking so I used steel which is likely about as heavy being very small. The steel is also vastly more durable for wear and won't eventually fatigue like aluminum. The stop for the pedal "up" position is fixed because I carefully located where I soldered the threaded rod to it so when the brake is not applied, the cable retracts completely into the housing and the threaded rod stops the cable from retracting any further and also seals up (sort of) the housing. The pedal height is adjustable by adjusting how far the rod end is threaded on the the cable end. The pedal rotates on a pair of small ball bearings pressed into the foot rest bracket. I got tired of pedals getting sloppy after a lot of use and these are still very precise with no discernable play. The pegs are modified off the shelf Bates folding pegs. Abominably heavy, but the pivots and stops wear like iron (well they are!). I really hate droopy foot pegs so I was willing to suffer the weight penalty (It is a street bike) but now a days you likely can find a slick off the shelf aluminum part.
 

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teazer

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

That's a nice set up, but is that a TD/TZ swingarm I see hiding in there?
 

jpmobius

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

That's a sharp eye you have sir. TR3 if memory serves.
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Thanks for all the input on rearset design! I appreciate it, and it will be implemented as I continue to design them! May end up having motion pro do up a cable for me once I have a design final.

Not much going on to speak of. I got a set of Chinese clip ons to get me going till I find the right setting, as they are fully adjustable. Once I find the sweet spot, I may make up a set out of billet permanently set to the desired angle.


Still trying to get this dang motor freed up. Gonna use the grease method as last ditch effort. It works good but dang it it a mess. Right now it's sitting full of my 50/50 acetone atf brew with a block heater on top.


Second barrel is a little trickier, as its stuck with the exhaust port open, thus won't hold fluid.
 

sav0r

Member
Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

I used Ox/acet, a wood block, and a hammer to get mine unstuck. It wasn't a feel good operation but I didn't damage anything either.
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Sav0r said:
I used Ox/acet, a wood block, and a hammer to get mine unstuck. It wasn't a feel good operation but I didn't damage anything either.
Eh, probably what I'll do, crank will likely be replaced anyways
 

sav0r

Member
Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

I ran my crank for nearly 2k miles. It looked clean as a whistle, no rust detected, and it measured within spec, but just barely. In retrospect, I don't think I'd recommend it.
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Sav0r said:
I ran my crank for nearly 2k miles. It looked clean as a whistle, no rust detected, and it measured within spec, but just barely. In retrospect, I don't think I'd recommend it.
I'm really thinking I'll just buy one of those vitos drop in cranks. This one will undoubtedly need a rebuild, and for 4 builds, I can't have that done
 

sav0r

Member
Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

I'm currently using a Vito's crank. Maybe 500 miles on it. The only opinion I have is that it's a great deal. Once I get a few more revolutions on it I will check it to see how it has held up. So far so good though.
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Sav0r said:
I'm currently using a Vito's crank. Maybe 500 miles on it. The only opinion I have is that it's a great deal. Once I get a few more revolutions on it I will check it to see how it has held up. So far so good though.
Good to know, I haven't found many actual reviews on them, so it's good to hear some first hand experience
 

jpmobius

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Don't assume that just your pistons are seized in the bores. I've seen cylinders pretty severely locked down to the case because corrosion has formed around the studs, and this definitely happens to RD's. Pour some penetrating oil into the holes for the studs and wait overnight. Then take a hammer and a block of wood and strike each cylinder alternately front and back. Be careful where you apply the blows, and don't over do it - you're just trying to get the tiniest movement. You should be able to at least get the joint at the base gasket to move no matter how badly the pistons are seized. It may take quite a bit of fussing to get observable movement so be patient and persistent and don't over do it and break something. As the cylinder sleeves fit quite tightly in the case, don't look for much motion - you should be able to get this joint to move a tiny bit with persistence though. Once you do, get an assistant and while lifting the engine by one cylinder, take another block of wood and strike the top of that cylinder's piston. Keep an eye on the base gasket joint. Once you get it to let go you should be able to drive them off. Under no circumstances whatever wedge anything between the case and cylinder base.
 

adventurco

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

I've had good luck with a rubber mallet, striking perpendicular to the fins front and back and a bit of heat to free stuck jugs.


Sent from my iPhone using DO THE TON
 

Hurco550

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Re: Yamaha rd350 road racer

Thanks again mobius! Got the studs soaking now!

Forgot to post this about the rearsets. I am making up these arms for mockup purposes. Fully adjustable at any degree and the hole locations are every 1/4" on center. Once I get them where I want them I'll get a set cut at the right angle/ hole locations.

 
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