Brat/rat first chop

SquidHunter

Member
I’m reading some stuck on retarding the timing by as much as 1/8” at idle. Saying it gives more lower end torque. Anyone experiment with this? All I can say is it idles and starts better in time. Seemed like it was retarded at 1/8th by the previous owner


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SquidHunter

Member
Pulled the swing arm off to redo it. Plastic like material bushings? Weird. No wonder it felt squirrelly. Brass bushings and needle bearing conversion should sure things up. Preparing for the rattle can paint job.
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SquidHunter

Member
Chipped away at it all day. Learned a few things. One thing is the bronze bushings are useless for the needle bearing conversion. I got the swing arm stripped down and primed. Got the steering neck off, but didn’t get to work on it. I was going to go ahead with the wheel bearings, but I’m going to have to purchase a bearing puller. Spent time pulling everything off to get the motor back out for fabrication on the frame, and then paint. Here’s where she sets
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SquidHunter

Member
Playing around with drilling the left hand case for air flow. Swapped out the worm gear. I didn’t do a very good job. I had good intentions and didn’t follow through. The holes are on the bottom side however, and I’m not sure it will matter much to me. I’ve got another case if I can’t live with it
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SquidHunter

Member
Headlight, tail light/tag bracket, uni pods and exhaust came in today. It’s getting real. I’m taking the wheels to work tomorrow to do the bearings


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I’m reading some stuck on retarding the timing by as much as 1/8” at idle. Saying it gives more lower end torque. Anyone experiment with this? All I can say is it idles and starts better in time. Seemed like it was retarded at 1/8th by the previous owner


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generally more timing makes everything better, unless it's too much.
 

The Jimbonaut

Well-Known Member
Chipped away at it all day. Learned a few things. One thing is the bronze bushings are useless for the needle bearing conversion. I got the swing arm stripped down and primed. Got the steering neck off, but didn’t get to work on it. I was going to go ahead with the wheel bearings, but I’m going to have to purchase a bearing puller.
You should be able to get those wheel bearings out without a puller - if you've got a drive you should be able to knock the things out
 

pidjones

Well-Known Member
Playing around with drilling the left hand case for air flow. Swapped out the worm gear. I didn’t do a very good job. I had good intentions and didn’t follow through. The holes are on the bottom side however, and I’m not sure it will matter much to me. I’ve got another case if I can’t live with itView attachment 221853


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Does it really need these? Concerned that forward bottom is right where front tire will pump water into it on a wet road. Should have a shield to prevent that.
 

SquidHunter

Member
Does it really need these? Concerned that forward bottom is right where front tire will pump water into it on a wet road. Should have a shield to prevent that.
Supposedly water won’t effect it. We will find out. Does it need the air flow. Here, yes. The pma will generate some heat when it starts shunting voltage. I’ve got a bad ass mosfet regulator that I’ve never used. I’ll hook it up if I decide it’s necessary. Also, Alabama gets damn hot in the summer and stays hot well into October. If water does become an issue, I’ve got another case.


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pidjones

Well-Known Member
Permanent magnet alternators put out according to speed, not load. The heat goes in the shunt regulator which shunts any extra to ground (on many, just one phase). The stator will heat, but on most bikes I've seen the failures happen in the regulator (not often, though) or the connectors from stator to regulator (common). I prefer a field coil regulated system, but you get what the manufacture gives. Clean, tight, waterproof (at least plenty diectectric grease) are most important. Plus, if you really want more air in there for cooling, you need to have somewhere for hot air to escape.
 

SquidHunter

Member
Permanent magnet alternators put out according to speed, not load. The heat goes in the shunt regulator which shunts any extra to ground (on many, just one phase). The stator will heat, but on most bikes I've seen the failures happen in the regulator (not often, though) or the connectors from stator to regulator (common). I prefer a field coil regulated system, but you get what the manufacture gives. Clean, tight, waterproof (at least plenty diectectric grease) are most important. Plus, if you really want more air in there for cooling, you need to have somewhere for hot air to escape.
Ahhh, that makes good sense. The hot air should push out the back of the cover. It’s open end where the front sprockets located. It may be worth going ahead with the mosfet regulator then? It doesn’t shunt simply turns off the charging. What would the adverse effects of that be?


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pidjones

Well-Known Member
Ahhh, that makes good sense. The hot air should push out the back of the cover. It’s open end where the front sprockets located. It may be worth going ahead with the mosfet regulator then? It doesn’t shunt simply turns off the charging. What would the adverse effects of that be?


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If you have a permanent magnet alternator, all the MOSFET will do is shunt to ground more efficiently. The magnetic field can't be controlled, so as long as it spins through the copper windings it generates current flow. MOSFET is just a more efficient and durable transistor. You would have to change to a field coil type (where a spinning electromagnet gives the magnetic field) alternator ('79 CB750F and others) to vary the alternator output. Think of a bucket being filled with water from a tap. With the shunt system, any un-needed overflows. With the field coil you can vontrol the tap instead of the overflow. I like the field coil system although it does add parts (brushes, commutators, field coil).
 

SquidHunter

Member
If you have a permanent magnet alternator, all the MOSFET will do is shunt to ground more efficiently. The magnetic field can't be controlled, so as long as it spins through the copper windings it generates current flow. MOSFET is just a more efficient and durable transistor. You would have to change to a field coil type (where a spinning electromagnet gives the magnetic field) alternator ('79 CB750F and others) to vary the alternator output. Think of a bucket being filled with water from a tap. With the shunt system, any un-needed overflows. With the field coil you can vontrol the tap instead of the overflow. I like the field coil system although it does add parts (brushes, commutators, field coil).
I’ll just keep on shunting then


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SquidHunter

Member
One thing I’m absolutely stumped on are fenders. I’m dreading it, and procrastinating big time. There’s too much internet noise and not enough useful information. What have you guys used? Is a front fender a viable option for the rear? Should I just pull the trigger on some chinesium and cut them up?


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Maritime

Well-Known Member
I'd definately put fenders of some sort if you plan to ride it at all. What exactly is a big IDK? I like to play with MS paint and paste ideas on the bike. it's crude but works to narrow stuff down sometimes. Now if you have access to Photoshop type stuff that's much better.
 

SquidHunter

Member
I'd definately put fenders of some sort if you plan to ride it at all. What exactly is a big IDK? I like to play with MS paint and paste ideas on the bike. it's crude but works to narrow stuff down sometimes. Now if you have access to Photoshop type stuff that's much better.
Well, I’m keeping the inner rear fender for a fact. It’s keeping the crud off my carbs. I’ve ridden it in the rain without a front fender...... never again. So I’m assuming I’ll have to get something undrilled to mount to the fork brace. I’ve got something in mind for that. The rear outer fender....... stumped


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