Simplified Wiring Digrams

vdubbles24

New Member
It's ALIVE!!

Thank you.

Now just out of curiousity what is the brown and brown/white wires originally for? Can I use them on a bare bones bobber style wiring set up?
 

Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
Those wires are for the tail light and gauge lights.

In older setups, turning on the headlight would put power onto the brown/white wire which turned on the gauges. The brown/white wire was also routed through back to the ignition switch so that it would pass power onto the brown wire on the tail light.

They pass through the ignition switch this way so that you could turn the key to the park position and have power go to just the brown wire and light up the tail light.
 

Harsh

New Member
For some reason the wiring on these bikes kicks my butt. I am changing the controls to a set from an 08 SV650. I am not sure if this is correct or not. I am not sure what to do with the Y and Y/w wires and I would like to add a switch to turn the headlight on/off.

Right Switch.........Bike

Black /r...............Black
Black /bl..............Green /y
Yellow /g.............Red /y
Orange /w...........Black /w
Orange /b............Black
Light Green..........Light Blue
Light Blue............Gray
Black..................Orange


Left Switch...........Bike

Black /y..............not used - clutch switch
Black /y..............not used - clutch switch
Black /w.............Light Green
Orange /g...........Black
Light Green.........Light Blue
Light Blue...........Gray
Black.................Orange
Orange..............Black
Yellow...............Blue
White................White
........................Yellow - to Alternator and RR
........................Yellow /w - to Alternator
........................Brown /w - power from ignition switch to speedo/tach lights. Doesn't have to run through handlebar controls.




 

mitchellsk

Member
Sonreir said:
Barebones diagram for the Honda twins and singles. Only enough to get the bike running and keep it that way. No lights, signals, or gauges included. Though not pictured, I recommend a 5A fuse on the black wire leading to the coils.
In this diagram the kill switch is wired directly to the battery, and I get that this is just wiring for a running bike, but there should be a solenoid added to the diagram because you'd never want anyone to wire the amperage of the battery through the tiny kill switch or it would overheat the switch and... kill stuff.

A solenoid should be added since it won't over-complicate the diagram add a ton of safety for people who might take the diagram literally.

Also... if you added the wire gauge for 12v and 6v systems in a legend it would be more awesome :)
 

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Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
MitchellSK said:
In this diagram the kill switch is wired directly to the battery, and I get that this is just wiring for a running bike, but there should be a solenoid added to the diagram because you'd never want anyone to wire the amperage of the battery through the tiny kill switch or it would overheat the switch and... kill stuff.

A solenoid should be added since it won't over-complicate the diagram add a ton of safety for people who might take the diagram literally.

Also... if you added the wire gauge for 12v and 6v systems in a legend it would be more awesome :)
Assuming you're using the stock switch, it can handle the current that the coils are pulling. It does just that in almost every vintage bike I can think of.

Admittedly a fuse isn't a bad idea, but a relay isn't necessary and doesn't add anything needed to a circuit as simple as this one.
 

rcs4140

New Member
Sonreir™ said:
Also... in your diagram, the yellow/white wire is superfluous. Splice the white in with the yellow and remove the other wiring run.
My son bought a '73 CB125 for a project bike. He bought a replacement light switch that doesn't have the DY/SE switch.

Been reading other posts. Sounds like:
That bike doesn't have a regulator
The battery is used instead to help regulate.
When the light switch is off, 1 leg of the alternator goes through the rectifier to charge the battery.
When the lights are on, all 3 legs are used to charge.

From the quote above, are you saying you can bypass the switch and always run all 3 alternator outputs to the rectifier? Any concerns with always running all 3 into the battery?
 

Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
rcs4140 said:
From the quote above, are you saying you can bypass the switch and always run all 3 alternator outputs to the rectifier? Any concerns with always running all 3 into the battery?
That's correct, but it's not advised in a system without a regulator. We have a few 6V regulator/rectifiers (not on our website) if you wanted one. $35, shipped. PM me if interested. If you wanted to upgrade to 12V, we can help with that, too.
 

jsmith1107

New Member
New to this site so sorry if I am missing it somewhere---has anyone did a simplified diagram for a Kawasaki 750 or 1100? I am currently working on a 1100 and turning it into a Street Tracker. Any help is appreciated!
 

doug1986

New Member
Evening to you all

This is my first post so apologies if this is a well trodden path, however I would very much appreciate if someone look over my wiring diagram.
This is for a 1969 Honda cb350, kick start, speedo, kill switch, front and back light only, using a reg/rec combo.
Any pointers would be most welcome.

Thanks
Doug
 

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Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
doug1986 said:
Evening to you all

This is my first post so apologies if this is a well trodden path, however I would very much appreciate if someone look over my wiring diagram.
This is for a 1969 Honda cb350, kick start, speedo, kill switch, front and back light only, using a reg/rec combo.
Any pointers would be most welcome.

Thanks
Doug
Power on the handlebar switch and on the rear brake switch should probably be going to black, not red. In the case of the rear brake switch, I can see an argument for wanting to be able to use it even when the bike is turned off, but it should probably connect in after the fuse, if this was the desired operation.
 

armand5000

New Member
Sonreir said:
Barebones diagram for the Honda twins and singles. Only enough to get the bike running and keep it that way. No lights, signals, or gauges included. Though not pictured, I recommend a 5A fuse on the black wire leading to the coils.


APOLOGIES IN ADVANCE IF ALREADY ASKED:

I am converting a (non-running) CB-100 to a full-time dirt-tracker. (I never intend on taking this bike on the street)

I would rather NOT use a battery, kickstart only. Can I use this same diagram (BAREBONES) and put (something) in place of the battery?

Resistor/Capacitor/straight connection? (this is a 6V setup as-is)

THANK YOU!
 

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Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
Capacitor, maybe. The early Hondas really don't like to be run without a battery, but if you can get it to idle without out one, go for it.
 

dwysywd

Member
@Sonreir, It looks like its been a year since anyone asked about wiring diagrams. I have read through all 14 pages, I am building a basic CB550 with new wire harness. I wanted to only have a headlight, stop/tail, and charging system with battery. Does my system setup change if I eliminate points in favor of an electronic ignition setup? I bought one a long time ago and now I can't find it, so I haven't decided if I am going to buy one again or not. That is why I am asking. Also, do you have a simple CB500/550 setup? Hopefully you can assist. Thanks in advance.
 

Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
dwysywd said:
@Sonreir, It looks like its been a year since anyone asked about wiring diagrams. I have read through all 14 pages, I am building a basic CB550 with new wire harness. I wanted to only have a headlight, stop/tail, and charging system with battery. Does my system setup change if I eliminate points in favor of an electronic ignition setup? I bought one a long time ago and now I can't find it, so I haven't decided if I am going to buy one again or not. That is why I am asking. Also, do you have a simple CB500/550 setup? Hopefully you can assist. Thanks in advance.
That should be a pretty simple harness to make. If you wanted to tackle the work, I'd be happy to provide assistance. I could also take care of it for you, if you wanted.

I've attached a wiring diagram to start from, in case you wanted to give it a shot. Before beginning the work, plan out the job. Look over the diagram and find the things you want to remove (start with easier stuff like turn signals and warning lights). Get used to what each color of wire does. If you're not sure, please feel free to ask. You don't want to make changes until you understand the impact it will have.

For instance, lets say you wanted to remove the starter motor and go kick only. Start at the motor and see which wires are connected. There's going to be one thick black cable running to the solenoid (aka starter magnetic switch). Understanding the purpose of the solenoid is next. If you don't know what it does, you can't be sure if it can be removed. In this case, a solenoid is just a high current switch and it's used only for the starter motor, so we're OK to remove it. That means all the wires connected to the solenoid can be removed as well, but only so far. If a wire connects to more than one place in the harness, you can't remove all of it. You can only remove it up to the place where it connects in with other wires. In this example, the black wire from the solenoid passes through the harness and also connects to the voltage regulator, passes through the harness again and connects to four or five other places. So what you remove the solenoid, you only want to remove the black wire for the solenoid and not the black wire for everything else. The yellow/red wire connects to the solenoid, the SSM, and the start button. You know you don't need the start button anymore and we know we don't need the solenoid anymore, so go ahead and remove all of the yellow/red wires. By inductive logic, we know we can eliminate all of the yellow/red wire (even though the SSM is connected) because we don't need the other two items connected to it. A single wire is useless for a circuit, and the yellow/red isn't grounded, and so we don't need to connect the SSM to anything else as far as the yellow/red wire is concerned. Take a look at the other wires on the solenoid and see if you can determine their purpose and how much of them you can eliminate. Also, because we've already made changes to the SSM, see if you can determine the purpose of the other wires so that you can make a decision on how to handle the SSM wiring.
 

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dwysywd

Member
Sonreir said:
That should be a pretty simple harness to make. If you wanted to tackle the work, I'd be happy to provide assistance. I could also take care of it for you, if you wanted.

I've attached a wiring diagram to start from, in case you wanted to give it a shot. Before beginning the work, plan out the job. Look over the diagram and find the things you want to remove (start with easier stuff like turn signals and warning lights). Get used to what each color of wire does. If you're not sure, please feel free to ask. You don't want to make changes until you understand the impact it will have.
This is great information. I think I am going to relocate the on/off toggle under the seat so I can lock it, I am eliminating the key. I like the idea of eliminating the starter, and going kick only. The engine is refreshed so it should be pretty easy to run kick start only. It would be nice to eliminate the starter. I like the challenge of tracking down these wires. Let me give it a poke and I will upload what I come up with. Thanks again for helping me get started. I am reading the other electrical "pages" you have pinned. I think this is a great education for anyone wanting to become more than just an assembler of parts and transcend into builder mode. Just like with my laced wheels, I had to jump in and tackle it on my own. So I appreciate the head start.
Regards,
J
 

tezza

Member
I've been attempting to draw a wiring diagram for my DOHC CB750 and I haven't yet seen another DOHC diagram on here so I figured I'd ask. Electrical things are a black art to me but I'd love to get a basic understanding of whats going on.

Just to add, I plan to use a motogadget m-unit control system.

I found this on another forum (through googling). So my question is, if I combine the two diagrams, will this work? Iirc the M-unit removes the need for fusebox?






Thanks!!!
i have just tried wiring my cb750KZ DOHC With the green drawing, and resulted in blowing two brand new igniters at £56 , i have tried all ways to get a bare bones wiring drawing but with no luck, every thing i do seems to either blow a fuse or not turn the bike over, HELP, i have put on new coils, leads, plugs, and started wiring from scratch as it was in such a state, i only need the bike to turn over and start,
 

tezza

Member
I've been attempting to draw a wiring diagram for my DOHC CB750 and I haven't yet seen another DOHC diagram on here so I figured I'd ask. Electrical things are a black art to me but I'd love to get a basic understanding of whats going on.

Just to add, I plan to use a motogadget m-unit control system.

I found this on another forum (through googling). So my question is, if I combine the two diagrams, will this work? Iirc the M-unit removes the need for fusebox?






Thanks!!!
has any one tried the green drawing as i have just blown two new igniters using it
 

Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
Looks correct to me. Pay special attention to the color changes where the spark unit plug into the wiring, though. The spark units use the same colors as each other, but those colors change when they connect to the harness, depending on if the spark unit is for the left or the right side.
 
Could anyone give this a quick sense check for me? Using an M-unit, single wire tail light, CDI has to be ran through a relay from what I gather (it needs a negative feed where the motogadget provides positive for the ignition circuit? - and mine is definitely a true CDI ignition)
 

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tezza

Member
Looks correct to me. Pay special attention to the color changes where the spark unit plug into the wiring, though. The spark units use the same colors as each other, but those colors change when they connect to the harness, depending on if the spark unit is for the left or the right side.
Thanks for reply, I have tried different permutations, and the last one blew the units, it looks like I have a serious short somewhere started with out spark units wired, then got motor to turn on key, then as soon as I connected the green earth wire on speakers, it all went down hill from there they just started smoking then popped.
 
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